How short is your title?

What is the shortest journal paper title that you have come across? For me it is H = W, by Norman G Meyers and James Serrin (Proc Nat Acam Sci USA, 1964 – see http://www.pnas.org/cgi/reprintframed/51/6/1055).

The paper proves that W^m_p(\Omega) = H^m_p(\Omega) where the first (Banach) space contains functions (distributions) whose norm,

\Vert v\Vert_{W^m_p(\Omega)} := \left(    \sum_{\vert\alpha\vert\le m}\Vert D^\alpha v\Vert_{L_p(\Omega)}^p    \right)^{1/p}

(with the usual \mathrm{max} and \mathrm{ess\, sup} adjustments when p=\infty), is finite while the second is defined as the closure of C^\infty(\Omega) \cap W^m_p(\Omega) with respect to that norm. The result is true if \Omega\subset\mathbb{R}^n is open but need not be if any part of the boundary is included.

By the way, not only is it a very short title, the paper itself is less than two sides.

The point of this entry to test LaTeX a bit more in this forum. I used Chrome to do this. IE seemed not to like \cap, and the LaTeX preview seems to get the math font sizes wrong…

Fit the First

Does \LaTeXe work? If so then find u\in V such that a (u, v) = <f, v> for all v\in V .

This was harder than it looks. Start the code with $ latex but without the space and end it with $ but make sure the code begins and ends with a space. Snarkish… Hence the borrowed title.